Teaching

I have designed, convened and taught courses at Wits and Birkbeck that cover everything from first year introductions to discourse and text to postgraduate seminars on race, gender and popular culture. During my tenure as Head of Department, Wits Media Studies was awarded both the Faculty Team Teaching Award and the Vice Chancellor’s Team Teaching Award.

I take a non-hierarchical approach to teaching and mentorship, inspired by the work of Paolo Freire. I try to emphasise dialogue, praxis, community and shared learning in and out of the classroom.

Since joining Wits in 2013, I have supervised six PhD, 10 Masters by Research and 24 Honours students. Completed student degrees include:

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Beauty Muromo (PhD, 2018): ‘The portrayal of politics and Christianity by the Zimbabwean print media during the socio-economic and political crisis (2008–2013)

Hugh Ellis (PhD, 2018): ‘Owning the image: Photography as a means of social empowerment in Namibia’. Winner of 2018 Kupe Prize for outstanding research in a Media Studies PhD (read a summary on The Conversation)

Christi Kruger (PhD, 2017): ‘(Dis)-empowered whiteness: an ethnography of the King Edward Park’. Winner of 2015 Monica Hunter Wilson prize for the best graduate presentation at the Anthropology Southern African annual conference

Candy Sithole (MA, 2019, with distinction): ‘Contemporary Representation and Imaginings of Family, Partnering and Love among Black South Africans in Date My Family’. Winner of 2019 Stuart Hall Award for outstanding research in a Media Studies MA

Aaisha Dadi Patel (MA, 2018): ‘Muslim masculinity in the media: Analysing Radio Islam’. Winner of 2018 Stuart Hall Award for outstanding research in a Media Studies MA

Callan Dunn (MA, 2017): ‘Sexy, smart and altogether spectacular: Analysing the self-display of young black South African women on Instagram’. Winner of 2017 Stuart Hall Award for outstanding research in a Media Studies MA

Joel Pearson (MA, 2015, with distinction): ‘Witchcraft management in early 20th century Transvaal’. Winner of 2015 prize for outstanding Masters research in the School of Social Sciences